Get Inspired

    The Difference Between Living Life And Not
    5 Simple Ways To Keep Your Mind Sharp
    Active or Passive
    Time: The most precious resource

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Difference between Living Life and Not

Author Adam Singer

Not everyone has passion. Not everyone is moved emotionally by what they do. And, that’s extremely unfortunate. But fortunately, you are not like everyone else.

The winning organizations in every industry are filled with passionate, vocal, active people (also, we have more fun doing what we do). To us, it isn’t even really ‘work’ in the sense that it flows naturally and feels more like creative freedom.

I think that truly passionate people are not understood by much of the world. I’ll give you one example: I don’t watch TV anymore. I tell people this, and it feels like many of them mentally file me in a category of being weird or socially deviant. Most people cannot fathom a world without television.

This is unfortunate, and altogether sad. We are at such an incredible turning point in society, and the world is changing for the better due to people with passion. Think about this:

From Clay Shirky:

If you take Wikipedia as a kind of unit, all of Wikipedia, the whole project–every page, every edit, every talk page, every line of code, in every language that Wikipedia exists in–that represents something like the accumulation of 100 million hours of human thought. I worked this out with Martin Wattenberg at IBM; it’s a back-of-the-envelope calculation, but it’s the right order of magnitude, about 100 million hours of thought. And television watching? Two hundred billion hours, in the U.S. alone, every year. Put another way, now that we have a unit, that’s 2,000 Wikipedia projects a year spent watching television. Or put still another way, in the U.S., we spend 100 million hours every weekend, just watching the ads. This is a pretty big surplus. People asking, “Where do they find the time?” when they’re looking at things like Wikipedia don’t understand how tiny that entire project is, as a carve-out of this asset that’s finally being dragged into what Tim calls an architecture of participation.
The world is shifting, and where before intellectuals used to be isolated and work on projects in a vacuum, now new social tools are allowing them to work together on deep projects that benefit everyone. Imagine, a group of complete strangers working together to create something incredible, inspiring and useful – all for free, and all due to pure internal motivation and desire to help the world.

Are you a part of a global project like Wikipedia? Or, global conversations about what you do professionally or are interested in personally? If not, you should be – the tools exist to interact with fantastic minds in our world, learn from them, and get better results and get inspiration for whatever you are doing.

Sorry if you’re a TV watcher, but if you watch even more than a tiny amount, it is a waste of life. I don’t mean to offend you, but really think about it: you are given a fleeting amount of time to physically exist on this planet and do something to change things for the better, and then you are gone. By watching TV for endless hours, you’re squandering life, the most previous gift there is.

By watching TV you make the ultimate sacrifice – you could be reading, writing, making art, or actually interacting with your friends, family and other professionals in your industry. Would you rather look back at a life spent passively absorbing nonsense, or one spent changing the world for the better and creating what inspires you. The choice is obvious.

I feel like most of you here don’t waste your life passively, so this post isn’t really for you. You’re already motivated and inspired. Forward this to a friend who isn’t.

Here’s what too many in society do:

• Get up in the morning
• Work, thinking inside the lines the entire day
• Come home
• Watch TV
• Sleep

It is an altogether unremarkable existence. And, those people probably produce ultimately unremarkable results and lead average lives.

If you wake up in the morning and aren’t inspired every day to throw yourself into your work and life with 100% passion, you’re not living it. I don’t understand how someone can live even one day like this.

Perhaps they’re in the wrong field, or have lost that creative spark. But regardless, there is no other way for truly intelligent people to live other than taking an active, passionate role in life and pouring their soul into something that inspires them.

The planet is billions of years old, and your lifespan is merely a cosmic blink. There’s not a day to waste.

This was inspired by this post at Unconventional Thinking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 Simple Ways to Keep Your Mind Sharp

Adam Singer

The importance of keeping your mind sharp cannot be overstated. We’re all part of a fantastic intellectual and information economy, which thrives on ideas, creativity and intelligence. Keeping your mind sharp is sure to give you the edge over the competition, and more importantly lead to your own higher levels of happiness.

When your mind is in top shape, you will:

• Have greater motivation and focus
• Get more done
• Come up with more creative ideas
• Find inspiration more often
• Remember more
• Experience a better life

I’d like to share a few practices I’ve found are extremely beneficial in keeping my mind sharp and can help you as well:

1) Continue reading, absorbing knowledge and experiencing culture
Sorry to use a clichéd quote, but education is not preparation for life, education is life itself. It should be something pleasurable and done for intrinsic reasons above all else. Read blogs on subjects both within your field and in new fields you know nothing about; read books; watch lectures on fascinating new subjects; read about ancient societies; take in a new form of art you’ve never experienced; you get the idea. Challenge your mind to continually broaden your horizon and soak up new information like an infinite sponge (that’s pretty much what it is, you should use it to do just that).

2) Learn a skill or craft you’ve never tried before like playing an instrument, composing music, painting, building a model airplane, or even coding computer programs.
Engage your mind in learning a new skill. You’re never too old to do this, but this is definitely something you should start as young as you can. I started composing my own music at around 17, and in retrospect I wish I had started even younger. You’d be surprised how much learning a new skill will open up many new paths in your mind and help you become even better at whatever you are already an expert at. You’ll also open yourself up to tons of new connections and intellectual social circles by engaging yourself in a new hobby, form of art, or trade.

3) To improve memory don’t write everything down
If you can, try this for a week: write down everything you need to do at the beginning of the week, as you normally would, but take your list and put it out of sight. Instead of keeping that list visible at your desk, internalize your projects and simply remember and know what needs to be done, prioritize it in your mind, and do it. Your brain is extremely powerful and you’ll find that, in time, you may not have to write anything down to remember everything (you can still keep a list for reference, but it’s great not to need it).

4) Give your mind time to assimilate knowledge
We live in a culture where we are constantly experiencing and learning new things and taking in new information. This is a great thing, I’m not going to go into the information overload spiel, I don’t really believe in that anyway (you are in total control over how much information you take in at once). But in your process of absorbing new skills, knowledge and life experiences; internal analysis of yourself, what you have learned and where you are going is vital to put everything in proper perspective. Some people do it well during running, others through listening to music, and some people through making art. Find your own place that allows you to assimilate all you have learned and frequent it often.

5) Eat well, sleep well and exercise often
Giving your mind the proper rest and energy is essential to getting the best performance out of it. This one is pretty self-explanatory, but people often forget that you need proper fuel and proper rest to function optimally. Also, putting your physical body through the paces is a surefire way to rejuvenate yourself mentally. If you’re ever feeling stressed, out of inspiration, or depressed, a few days of nutritious food, good sleep and vigorous exercise will put you back to your full self soon enough.

(See more at: http://thefuturebuzz.com/2008/03/11/5-simple-ways-to-keep-your-mind-sharp/#sthash.Pqwpd2Xh.dpuf)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Active vs. Passive

Author
Adam Singer

• Active people use the Internet to express themselves and learn about their world…passive people watch TV.

• Active people strategize their life plans and work to accomplish their goals…passive people wait for a miracle.

• Active people cook their dinner fresh…passive people microwave something frozen.

• Active people walk around a new city they are exploring…passive people take cabs.

• Active people spend their lives pursuing their dreams…passive people have a midlife crisis.

• Active people don’t wait for opportunity; they create it…passive people need it handed to them.

• Active people blog, submit op-eds to their newspaper, and are influencers…passive people purely consume news.

• Active people make their own opinions on things…passive people let others make up their minds for them.

• Active people analyze all their options and choices before making a decision…passive people go with whatever is easiest.

• Active people build their own…passive people buy it.

• Active people are artists, writers, builders, influencers, trendsetters and decision makers…passive people just are.

• Active people volunteer, give calls to action, help others and make their world better…passive people complain.

• Active people make art…passive people negatively criticize it.

• Active people read and have an infinite thirst for knowledge…passive people hasn’t read a book since college.

• Active people are passionate…passive people don’t know the meaning of the word.

• Active people spend their weekends pursuing their dreams, hobbies, and inspiring others…passive people spend them on the couch.

So are you an active or passive person?

(See more at: http://thefuturebuzz.com/2008/03/06/active-vs-passive/#sthash.rRsNDUCD.dpuf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time: The Most Precious Resource

Author Adam Singer

The passage of time is concept that I’ve spent a great deal of effort trying to wrap my mind around. It is especially problematic because while time itself is a constant, it’s perception in our minds is continuously in flux. It’s worthwhile, if you’re able to, to try and slow time down as much as possible and try to get the most out of each moment. Time itself is far more valuable than money, fame, possessions, etc. – probably the most important real or abstract resource there is.

Value itself can be measured in time, even more so than money, for if you can get people to devote time to your cause, this can in many cases demonstrate that they are even more interested in helping you/your cause than those who simply give money. The people who say ‘time is money’ are right to a degree, but I’ll go a step further and say that ‘time is more precious than money.” You can always get more money – but there is no way to gain extra time; only extend the experience and perception of it.

Time is so important because we only have X amount, where X equals moments in existence. You really can’t stretch it much further than what our physical bodies were designed to handle (this does vary slightly based on genetics), but I would say more than a raw number, how you spend those moments (whatever you most intimately enjoy doing) make up the purpose and function of that time. Looking back on life with regret is only a waste of time if you didn’t learn and grow from those experiences, and I do not believe you are ever wasting time if you are learning, growing and broadening your understanding of yourself, your interests and humanity itself.

Who you surround yourself with and what you do during the X amount of moments on earth speaks volumes for what exactly you represent, and even if you think or speak a certain way, how you spend your time will almost always reflect your true persona. People spend a great deal of time simply thinking about ways they can change their lives, and how “next year of my life” will be better – but this isn’t true, and is an unfortunate squandering of time. Your life will never change and you won’t all of a sudden start accomplishing your goals – unless of course you make a change right now, at this moment in time. Simply thinking about making a change will almost always result in no change.

Now is a powerful word, something many people have a hard time grasping. Everyone wants to make changes to their lives, but I’ve discovered that only those who act decisively and have the self-control to put something into action at will are the most successful human beings, and able to alter the course of their lives. We should all freely be enjoying our time while also respecting it, and using our time to mold ourselves like clay into an ideal self-image of what we want to be. This should be one of our most treasured goals in life, and I think we should all be using our time in this manner.

(See more at: http://thefuturebuzz.com/2007/11/23/time-the-most-precious-resource/#sthash.GKh1Yfx1.dpuf)